Um cafezinho, por favor (a coffee, please)

“Cafes are at the heart of urban myths, they are celebrated as physical places and as somehow intangible sacred halls…

“Cafes are at the heart of urban myths, they are celebrated as physical places and as somehow intangible sacred halls where works of art have been produced, revolutions plotted, lives made and hearts broken” (Grafe and Bollery, 2007).

Despite what Grafe and Bollery statement, I do not feel part of this much celebrated cafe culture. I collect many references of cafe culture through movies, books and art. The expensive cafes of Paris, with its fancy tiny tables; the delightful view of San Marco Plaza through a cafe window; the spectacular variety of tea in a London cafe; the strange smell of the Amsterdam’s coffee shop; the cheap hot chocolate in one of the many corner’s coffee shops in north america.

Camburi's Beach

I was looking for industrial landscape to illustrate environment degradation for my sociology class when I remembered that my home city could be one of the examples. The first think that pass through my mind was the background of Camburi’s Beach. People go there to enjoy themselves in a summer sunday with a such big port in front of them. Not that it isn’t a good place, it is a urban beach. But it is barely suitable for swimming since the water and wind movement bring many particle of iron ore – it is the largest port of export iron ore in the world.

I recovered from my bookmarks this website that shows a timeline aerial photograph mapping of the city where you can see how the port develops during the last 40 years:

http://veracidade.com.br/?zoom=4&lat=7757024.77304&lon=368517.93223&layers=TTFFFFFFTF

Workflow Interface for Editorial Process

Scholars usually have to deal with many different type of documents spread in vary stages, especially in the case of…

Scholars usually have to deal with many different type of documents spread in vary stages, especially in the case of big projects. Piles and piles of documents scattered in many folders waiting for tagging, revision, approval or whatever it is that needs to be completed. There are workflow management tools available to help us, but they often are too specialized and somewhat complex to use. So, how can we make them easier and more flexible?

You can read the paper here, or check more information at INKE website: http://inke.ca/2012/07/19/luciano-frizzera-presents-at-digital-humanities-2012/

Designing Interactive Reading Environments for the Online Scholarly Edition

At Digital Humanities 2012, in Hamburg, Germany, INKE ID team presented the panel “Designing Interactive Reading Environments for the Online Scholarly…

At Digital Humanities 2012, in Hamburg, Germany, INKE ID team presented the panel “Designing Interactive Reading Environments for the Online Scholarly Edition”. In this panel, members of the Interface Design team of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) project presented a set of ideas, designs, and prototypes related to the next generation of the online scholarly edition, by which we mean a primary text and its scholarly apparatus, intended for use by people studying a text.

Geoffrey Rockwell, Stéfan Sinclair, Mihaela Ilovan, Geoff Roeder, and Daniel Sondheim  presented a paper entitled “Designing Interactive Reading Environments for the Online Scholarly Edition” at Digital Humanities 2012 at the University of Hamburg in Hamburg, Germany. It was presented on July 20 2012, and written by Milena Radzikowska, Stan Ruecker, Geoffrey Rockwell, Susan Brown, Luciano Frizzera, and the INKE Research Group.

You can read the abstract here, or check more information at the INKE website: http://inke.ca/2012/07/20/inke-id-presents-a-panel-at-digital-humanities-2012/

Daniel Sondheim presented a paper at INKE Textual Studies team’s conference Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the 21st Century, in Victoria, BC. The paper was written with the help of Geoffrey Rockwell, Stan Ruecker, Mihaela Ilovan, Luciano Frizzera, and Jennifer Windsor, and was entitled “From Print to the Web and Back: The Current State of Scholarly Editions.”

See more information at INKE website: http://inke.ca/2012/06/09/daniel-sondheim-presents-at-beyond-accessibility-textual-studies-in-the-21st-century/

INKE ID members attended the annual SDH/SEMI conference at Congress 2012 of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The conference was held in Waterloo, Ontario, on May 28-30. Members presented a panel entitled “Interface to Interface Research” speaking about year three projects of the ID team. Introductions and conclusions were given by Stan Ruecker, Geoffrey Rockwell, and Milena Radzikowska; Luciano Frizzera spoke about a workflow interface that ID is developing for editorial processes; Jennifer Windsor analyzed and explained the design of scholarly e-readers; Daniel Sondheim compared scholarly editions in print and on the Web; and Geoffrey Rockwell presented RIPr, ID’s rich prospect browser for studying interface design. In another session, Mihaela Ilovan presented a paper on CiteLens, a tool for exploring humanist citation practices by means of visualizations. SDH/SEMI was very well attended this year, and all of the talks went well.

Check more information at INKE website: http://inke.ca/2012/06/02/id-team-presents-at-sdhsemi/